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Buying a HUD Home: Easy as 1-2-3 (Video Included)

by David Tyler Mills

Here at McNaughton Real Estate, we are asked everyday on how to buy a HUD home.  Rightfully so, HUD homes are the hot topic in terms of getting the most value out of your investment.  Believe it or not, it is surprisingly easy to buy your own.

  1. Get a Pre-Approved letter.
  2. View the Property with a McNaughton Realtor®.
  3. Submit your Bid.
  4. Submit your Contract Package to Asset Manager.

Not only is it that easy, we’ll do steps 3 and 4 for you!  Don’t let the buying process keep you from a great investment.  Check out all the HUD homes in Northwest Arkansas at www.allNWAhomes.com and give us a call!

 

Old School U of A (Like REAL Old School)

by David Tyler Mills

Old Main

University of Arkansas campus

This two-towered hall was the first permanent building to be erected on the campus of Arkansas Industrial University, later renamed the University of Arkansas. It was designed by architect John M. Van Osdel in the second empire style. Today, it is home to the J. William Fulbright College of Arts and Sciences.
Old Main


Buchanan Hall

University of Arkansas campus

The first men's residence hall at the University of Arkansas, then still known as Arkansas Industrial University, was Buchanan Hall, named for the university's sixth president, John L. Buchanan. "Buck Hall," as the students referred to it, opened in 1888 and served the university until 1937.

Buchanan Hall


Dress Presentation

Front Lawn of Old Main, University of Arkansas

Because they were attending a land grant university, all male students at the University of Arkansas were compelled to participate in study of military science, which included drills on the front lawn of Old Main. Although no longer compulsory, students can study military science as well as aeronautics through the Reserve Officers' Training Corps.
Dress Presentation

Carnall Hall

University of Arkansas campus

Carnall Hall on the University of Arkansas campus was the first female residence hall on the campus, and it was named for one of the university’s first female faculty members, Ella Howison Carnall. It was designed by Charles L. Thompson in a colonial revival style and opened to students in 1906. Today it is an on-campus hotel and restaurant, used in part to train students in hospitality management.

Carnall Hall


Agriculture Campus

Agricultural Grounds, University of Arkansas

This lane, though paved and widened, is still used by students walking from Maple Street to Mullins Library. The buildings include the Agricultural Library at left, the Experiment Station beyond it and the Agriculture Building at right.

Agriculture Campus


Agriculture Building

University of Arkansas campus

Designed by Charles L. Thompson, the first Agriculture Building was finished in time for fall classes in 1906. Later, it served the campus as the university's infirmary but was put back into use for agricultural purposes after a new health center was built in 1965. Today, it is known as the Agricultural Annex.

Agriculture Building


Chemistry Building

University of Arkansas campus

The first Chemistry Building was finished in 1906 and served in that function until 1935, when the current Chemistry Building was erected. It was then used for the School of Law until Waterman Hall was built in 1953. Subsequently, the psychology and geography departments used the building and most recently, Student Support Services and the School of Social Work have been based in it.


Chemistry Building


Engineering Hall

University of Arkansas campus

The first Engineering Hall was built in 1904 by contractor Albert Byrnes for $22,500. It was southwest of Old Main on the University of Arkansas campus. After the new Engineering Hall was built in 1927, this building was renamed Commerce Hall and used for business classes. It was torn down in 1988.


Engineering Hall


Engineering Day

Front Lawn of Old Main, University of Arkansas

Engineering students began observing an Engineering Day each year starting in 1909 on St. Patrick's Day. The event developed a rivalry with the already established Agriculture Day and both eventually became week-long affairs.

Engineering Day


Gray Hall

University of Arkansas campus

One of the first dormitories for men on the University of Arkansas campus, Gray Hall was finished in 1906 and stood about where Mullins Library is today. It was named for Oliver C. Gray, a professor and commander of the military department at the university for many years. It was razed in 1966.

Gray Hall


Arkansas vs. Oklahoma

University of Arkansas campus

In 1909, the Arkansas football team went undefeated, fending off such powerhouse teams as the University of Oklahoma (pictured) and Lousiana State University. So tough was Arkansas that year that the University of Mississippi forfeited its game rather than make the trip to Arkansas. It was also the year that the term "Razorback" became popularized as the mascot of the University of Arkansas. The football field was about where the plaza between the Arkansas Union and Mullins Library is today.

Arkansas vs. Oklahoma


Experiment Station

University of Arkansas campus

Built in 1888, the original Agricultural Experiment Station was erected at the high point of campus next to present-day Maple Street. The cost of construction was $4,000 with a similar amount being spent on equipment. After agricultural operations were moved to other buildings, the experiment station became home to the music department and later still to the university's news bureau and alumni office. It was razed in 1972.

Experiment Station


Greenhouse

University of Arkansas campus

A horticultural greenhouse called the Conservatory was built in 1898 at a site about where Memorial Hall now stands. It was destroyed by fire in the fall of 1920.

Greenhouse


University Shops

University of Arkansas campus

Pictured is the third mechanical shop erected at the University of Arkansas. Two earlier shop buildings were both destroyed by fire, the first one in 1895 and the second in 1902. This one also was destroyed by fire after an apparent explosion of metal in the foundry room.

University Shops


Infirmary

University of Arkansas campus

The first infirmary at the University of Arkansas was built in 1906 about where the east end of the Leflar Law Center is today. It later served as home for the home economics department and still later for the social welfare department. It was razed in 1972 for the eastward expansion of the law school.

Infirmary


Hill Hall

University of Arkansas campus

Construction started on Hill Hall in 1901 but it didn't open for residents until 1902. It was named for Gen. Daniel Harvey Hill, the third president of the university. It served as a residence hall until 1946, briefly was a women's residence hall and then became the home of the journalism department, the university's news bureau, student media and university printing press. It was razed in 1993 to allow expansion of Mullins Library.

Hill Hall


Senior Walk

University of Arkansas campus

The longest tradition at the University of Arkansas in terms of distance, Senior Walk was established in 1905 and includes the names of graduates of the university, dating back to the first graduates in 1875.

Senior Walk


Content found on www.fayettevillehistory.com.

War Eagle Craft Fair is Coming Up!

by David Tyler Mills

 

About the Fair…

From the outset, the War Eagle Fair was a project of, by and for little people: A group of little old ladies exhibiting their weaving. When that attracted a greater than expected response, other unsung artists and craftsmen were invited to participate. There has never been a government subsidy or sponsorship, no professional nor commercial assistance, just unpaid volunteers led by an Arkansas farmer and his wife. It has all happened in a magical place.

The pioneer Sylvanus Blackburn built his home here in 1832 and it still stands, and the War Eagle River still flows where it powered the turbine of Sylvanus' mill. Nearly everyone who comes here feels something special, and no doubt that is one reason so many have come to this once obscure spot over the past quarter of a century. Untold numbers in the millions (yes, millions) and the great and the mighty have joined the poor and the humble here

Some Info…

Fall Fair dates: October 13 - 16, 2011

Parking fee $2 per vehicle

Seminars…

The War Eagle Seminar was an educational program of the Ozark Arts & Crafts Fair Association, sponsors of the nationally-known War Eagle Fair™. Writing of the early years of the Seminar, former Executive Director Blanche Elliott said,

“An unmatched opportunity was offered for the amateur or the professional to enlarge his artistic talents and improve his techniques at a very reasonable cost. To some, the seminar was a profitable vacation in a secluded countryside, knee-deep in June. To others, it was two weeks of uninterrupted painting, whittling, weaving, or potting that was difficult to come by at home. Out of it all came a fellowship of kindred spirits born of the joy of creating beauty with hands and heart…”

Exhibitors…

The War Eagle Fair began in 1954 to showcase arts and crafts of the Ozark region. The Board of Directors of the nonprofit association paid scrupulous attention to quality, went out of their way to revive traditional arts and crafts in danger of extinction, and offered visitors free admission and free parking. (Due to rising costs, 2011 will mark the first year the Organization will charge for parking.) Exhibitors undergo strict screening for entry, and must abide by carefully enforced rules and standards. They sell products of their own skill and creativity.

  • Who may exhibit?

Anyone who lives in the United States as long as they have handmade products.

  • How can I become an exhibitor?

This is the most common question asked at the Fair office. Those interested in becoming exhibitors can print an application in Adobe PDF file format or write and request a screening form, enclose a long stamped, pre-addressed envelope and mail to: The War Eagle Fair, PO Box 796, Rogers, AR 72757.   No applications are accepted via fax or email.

  • What are my chances of getting into the Fair as an exhibitor?

Each year, there are far more people who request applications than can be accommodated. Still there are new exhibitors each year. Providing you meet the other requirements, your chances are greater if you are among the best in your field and if the Fair does not already have a large proportion of offerings similar to yours.

Planning a Trip…

As always, there is no admission charge to the War Eagle Fair. Beginning in 2011, a $2 per car parking fee will be implemented. A well trained parking crew directs you in and out, and you won't have to hunt for good food. No dogs are allowed on the grounds, in the tents, or buildings except trained Medical Assist dogs. A first aid station is in the center of everything.  There are permanent restrooms and plenty of porta-potties and even a free package checking service. Don't get so caught up in the tents that you miss the exhibit building! Gates open at 8 a.m. each day and close at 5 p.m. on Thursday, Friday, and Saturday and at 4 p.m. on Sunday.

  • What is the best route to the Fair?

Because of traffic congestion on the one-lane iron bridge across the War Eagle River, we recommend that visitors approach from the south via U.S. 412 and AR Hwy 303.

  • What's the weather like?

Generally, the nights are cool and days are warm, but bring a variety of clothing as it can be quite cool or quite warm.

  • Where can we camp?

There are many campgrounds in nearby areas, particularly along Beaver Lake, including both government and commercial sites ranging from rustic to those with complete facilities. Self-contained camping units are permitted in specified areas on War Eagle Mills Farm, along with tents.

  • What about the Spring Fair?

Started in 1962, the Spring Fair began as an Antique show. After 45 annual events, the last Spring Fair was held in 2006.

  • Is the Fall Fair always at the same time?

No. In the past it has been as early as October 13 and as late as October 29. However, beginning in 1990 it has always started on the Thursday before the 3rd Saturday in October.

***All Information collected from www.wareaglefair.com.***

It’s Time to Take Another Look at Short Sales

by David Tyler Mills

As recently as a few months ago, if you would have told a real estate agent who specialized in short sales that they’d be raving about a lender’s stellar service and rapid approval times—not to mention significant cash incentives for financially strapped homeowners for pursuing a short sale—you’d have gotten some strange looks.

That’s all changed.  And it’s changed faster and to a greater extent than most real estate professionals ever could have imagined.

With a glut of bank-owned properties dragging down the recovery of the real estate market, as well as the national economy, major lenders are more eager than ever before to avoid foreclosure. So they’ve sharpened their focus on short sales. Big time.

The biggest lenders in the country have staffed up to ensure rapid processing of short sale applications. They’ve ponied up with cash incentives at closing for homeowners who pursue a short sale. And they’re proactively reaching out to CDPE agents and putting them in touch with delinquent borrowers.

This is big news and the media has not really caught onto it yet. What’s important for you to know is that whatever you’ve read or heard in the past about long lag times and frustrations with short sales is probably no longer the case.

As a member of the CDPEAdvanced community, we’ve tapped into major lenders and on top of major developments affecting short sales and bank-owned properties.  We invite you to visit our website http://www.allnwahomes.com/ to learn more and feel free to contact us any time at 479-442-9099 if you or anyone you know is struggling with an unmanageable mortgage.

Displaying blog entries 1-4 of 4

Contact Information

Photo of Don McNaughton Real Estate
Don McNaughton
McNaughton Real Estate
4299 W. Persimmon
Fayetteville AR 72704
479-442-9099
Fax: 479-442-0948
       

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